Quest Feature with Julie Miller, Counsellor

Julie’s Top 5 Tips for Relieving Stress

  1. Be in the moment and tackle what’s in it.
  2. Self-care! (Whatever that means to you: tend the cactus garden, go for sushi, or if you’re Julie, a wee 25 km run across Black Tusk.)
  3. You know it’s coming…know what works for you. Plan ahead for stress.
  4. Find your strengths.
  5. Don’t compare yourself to others. When we do, we lose track of what makes us great.

Julie’s Top 3 SOS Tips (Supporting Other Students)

  1. Advice not required. Be a good listener.
  2. Remind people of their self-care.
  3. Become a good referral service. Whether that be suggesting your friend take a yoga course or a seat in the (huge and comfy) counselling chair in Julie’s office—it’s not up to you to fix the woes of the world.

What Julie does for the Quest community: Supervises the health clinic, supervises the interns, counsels students, writes (policies and the Stall St. Journal)

What Julie does in fewer than 10 words: Makes sure health & wellness is a priority on campus

Busiest time of year for counselling services: November. Students are deep into Third Block with a long way to go before spring.

Question: How can sport impact body positivity? (Instead of, What does my body look like?, ask yourself, What am I capable of doing with my body?)

Quote: You are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, smarter than you think, and more beautiful than you could ever imagine.

Passion: Ultras. For those uninitiated, that’s any footrace longer than a marathon. Not necessarily racing for Julie, though. Sometimes it’s just a three-day adventure into the backcountry with a pal, 50 km at a time, and seeing where they end up!

Why Quest, Julie? I love working with university-age people. They are resilient. They are open to learning new tools. They are willing to make changes. At Quest, 60% of students have seen a counsellor. I think that’s a good sign that Quest students prioritize their mental health. With everyone living on campus, we are in a type of family system. We impact each other. We learn to support each other. We find out how to contribute our strengths and value the areas we can grow.

Hometown: Toronto, Ontario

University: University of Victoria (Bachelor of Social Work) UBC (Masters of Social Work)

 

MATH: the bigger picture

At Quest, math isn’t just about memorizing equations and numbers —  it’s about seeing the bigger picture.

Richard Hoshino, award-winning Quest Math Tutor, speaks on his Quest experience, and how mathematics relates to everyday life through communication and problem-solving skills.

Also featured is Quest student and member of the Leaders in Elite Athletics & Performance Program, Jeneva Beairsto, for her creative and valuable Keystone project. Jeneva addressed the issue of travel fare inequality by creating an optimal pricing formula that will be implemented by the Vancouver transit system.

Video created by Quest student Ben Grayzel

 

 

 

Quest is unlike any other university in Canada. Visiting the campus is the best way to experience the academics, the environment, and the unique culture.

Arts at Quest

With a creative and talented student community, it’s no surprise that the Arts represent a flourishing component of Quest culture. Our Artist in Residence program brings creative artists to the university for 6-week campus residencies. This special program allows us to provide a wide variety of art-based opportunities and courses for students throughout the year.

Quest President Dr. George Iwama provided the keynote address at the launch of the First Year Model at Victoria University in Melbourne, Australia. The launch was to introduce first-year students to the Block Plan structure.

“The block model opens student minds and honours learning passion,” he said. “Students learn to construct knowledge rather than have it transferred to them.”

Read about it here.

A Keystone documentary that captures the testimonies of Salvadoran women in an attempt to humanise the gruesome statistics about gender violence in El Salvador.  She wants to translate the inner thoughts and emotions of women into images and sound. The narrative will be done through interviews and will be paired up with images that both me and the women sharing their stories will choose.

View the video here.

Richard Hoshino’s Adrien Pouliot Award

Accepting his award, Richard Hoshino presented four of his favourite math problems, and shared stories of how they lead to authentic mathematical experiences for both high school students and undergraduates. He presented four key problem-solving strategies that enable mahematicians and educators to impact others’ lives.

Read the story here.

Admissions Open House February 17, 2018

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Quest LEAP / The Katherines

This is The Katherines, a band of talented musicians and students who are part of the LEAP Program at Quest University Canada. LEAP isn’t just for athletes; it’s a perfect fit for performers too. Quest’s Liberal Arts education provides them with a well-rounded set of skills that allows them to pursue their studies while they reach new musical heights.


Quest University Canada student Miguel Orlando Chiau, a Mastercard Foundation Scholar, is among the speakers who will present at The Walrus Talks Africa’s Next Generation (Ottawa) on September 26. Miguel is a second-year student from Mozambique studying computer science. He is passionate about Africa and social inclusion, and envisions himself bringing change to his continent and believes that higher education is a prerequisite for achieving this goal.

Read More…

Herieth Ringo: Mastercard Foundation Scholar

Quest University Canada student Herieth Ringo, a Mastercard Foundation Scholar in the Program at African Leadership Academy, authored the essay To Build Confidence, Young Africa Must Focus on What it Does Well. In the essay, Herieth discusses creating the right conditions for young Africans to flourish as confident leaders.

Read More…

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On September 1, 2017, the Canadian Mathematical Society announced that Dr. Richard Hoshino is the recipient of the 2017 Adrien Pouliot Award for significant and sustained contributions to mathematics education in Canada. Founded in 1945, the Canadian Mathematical Society (CMS) promotes the advancement, discovery, learning and application of mathematics. Richard is the youngest mathematician to have received this prestigious award in recognition of individuals “who have made significant and sustained contributions to mathematics education in Canada.” Adrien Pouliot was the second President of the CMS and was described as a world-class ambassador for science and mathematics and a great educator.

Richard’s colleague Dr. Glen van Brummelen, himself a 2017 National Teaching Fellow, noted that the award is essentially a national lifetime achievement award and that Richard has been “one of the most valued people in the Canadian mathematics education community” even before coming to Quest. Prior to his arrival at Quest in 2013, Richard was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute of Informatics in Tokyo (2010-2012), and was a mathematician with the Government of Canada (2006-2010), leading the mathematics and data exploration section at the Canada Border Services Agency. He has published 28 research papers across numerous fields, including graph theory, marine container risk-scoring, biometric identification, and sports scheduling.

Richard is a former Mathematics Olympian and has coached the students representing Canada at the International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO). He recently penned a novel The Math Olympian aimed at young people as a way to reach and inspire even more students. He frequently visits high schools to give public talks, and has reached thousands of students in British Columbia over the past four years. He has also led numerous professional development workshops for high school math teachers, and has organized or keynoted math education workshops and conferences throughout Canada. Hoshino is an active member of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), and will be the local organizer for the next CMESG meeting, to be held at Quest in June 2018.

For more information about Richard’s award, please see the press release from the Canadian Mathematical Society.

Quest’s New President Dr. George Iwama

August 25, 2017

The Board of Governors of Quest University Canada is proud to announce that Dr. George Iwama has been appointed the University’s next President.

Quest is the national and global leader of a distinct philosophy of inquiry-based education, and is committed to continuing to innovate and share its work.

When we started our search for a new President, we set out to find someone who would:

  • Champion Quest’s mission, vision, and values;
  • Continue to strengthen, defend, and renew Quest’s pedagogical approach;
  • Recruit and support a truly distinctive student body;
  • Recruit and support world-class teacher-scholars;
  • Ensure a sustainable business model; and
  • Serve as a compelling and effective advocate for Quest as its leading external ambassador.

We strongly believe Dr. Iwama is an outstanding candidate, and we are excited about adding his experience and leadership to Quest University Canada.

Dr. Iwama will be a critical part of helping our University tackle the challenges and seize the opportunities that lie ahead by continuing to develop and champion the vision of Quest as a place for innovation in teaching and learning.

We look forward to hosting a social welcome event where students, staff, and community members can meet and get to know our new President this fall – stay tuned for details. For more information on Dr. Iwama, please visit the Incoming President webpage.

With appreciation,
Mary Jo Larson
Chair, Board of Governors
Quest University Canada